Aggressive cat behavior

by Emma
(England)

I have a 3 year old cat which I have had since she was 12 weeks old, she came from a friends litter of which the mother was a very 'normal' family cat, the father (or supposed) father, was also their family cat and was very loving and affectionate. I wonder if he was the father though which you will understand as I go on!


Ever since my cat was a kitten, she hasn't been your normal loving cat. She started off being affectionate but quickly became not so loving unless she wanted it. If you petted her she would only tolerate it if she wanted it, otherwise she was bite your hand. (I understand this is quite normal).

She was spayed as soon as she was old enough and vaccinated, although she did have a reaction to the vaccination and needed anti-histimine.

She has gradually become more and more aggresive though, biting, hissing, growling, striking out at us.

She is regularely treated for fleas and wormed. We have had a prolonged problem with a suspected allergy - she started by pulling the hair off her bottom and back legs 2 years ago which seemed to sort itself out - the vet said it was a behavioral issue. Now she scratches her neck and has been treated with steroid injections and anti-biotics, the vet has treated her a few times for this and says it seems to be an allergy but we arent sure what to, it seems to calm itself, then start again but no diagnosis has been made, possibly behavioural.

Chloe has always been a very shy cat and doesn't generally allow anybody except for myself and partner near her comfortably.

The last time I took her to the vet, I asked about her aggression and was told this is 'how cats should be' and its likely her father was a ferel.

It has got to the point now though, that I cannot accept this behaviour anymore. My arms are covered in scratches where she has striked out at me. She has got to the point where she is like this all the time. I did get a new cat a month ago who is very loving and affectionate - he just wants to be friends with Chloe but she hisses, growls, strikes out at him. They both have their own food bowls, water, litter trays etc. I know cats are very territoral, if it was new behaviour I would blame the arrival of the new cat, but it isnt.

I am at the point where I am scared to go near her for fear of what she is going to do.

Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Answer by KAte
Hi
Firstly can i say I don't like your vet much. he doesn't sound that helpful to me. Has he done any blood work at all, sometimes aggression is caused by a hormone imbalance.

Of course it could be the cat does not feel that well most of the time if they do have an allergy problem, this will often cause a cat to be aggressive and fed up, well who wouldn't. My cat was allergic to flea bites and needed antihistamines now and again because even though she was treated for fleas one would jump on her from outside and bite her and this would set off her allergy.

Yes it is true that feral cats can sometimes never be friendly to anyone and are often best kept in a home where they can have lots of freedom outside most of the time. Sometimes this is the best life for these cats , being fed and cared for but basically being free to do there own thing.

If it were me I would find a new vet for a second opinion, ask if their could be any physical reason for her aggression.

At the end of the day if there is no cause for her aggression apart from it being her nature then you will have to decide whether or not you can life with this cat like this or if it would be better to find her a home where she is more free.


http://www.our-happy-cat.com/aggressive-cat-behavior.html

best wishes Kate

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